Hoover Dam Facts; Hoover Dam Powerhouse – Quick Facts

Hoover Dam Facts and Statistics

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Hoover Dam intake towers under construction

Hoover Dam

  • 726.4 feet high (221 meters)
  • 1,244 feet wide (379 meters)
  • 660 feet (203 meters) thick at the base
  • 45 feet (13 meters) thick at the top
  • $165 million dollars to build
  • 4.5 years to build
  • 4.4 million yards of concrete used for construction
  • Building began March 1931; Lake Mead began to form behind Hoover Dam in 1935
  • September 30, 1935 President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the completed Boulder Dam Project, and in his speech Roosevelt officially named the dam “Boulder Dam”
  • A three-cent stamp was issued by the United States Post Office Department—bearing the name “Boulder Dam”, the official name of the dam between 1933 and 1947
  • Boulder Dam was re-named “Hoover Dam” by Congress in 1947
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One of Two Hoover Dam Generator Rooms – Photo taken on a Nevada Power Plant Tour

Hoover Dam Powerhouse

  • Hoover Dam has Two Powerhouses – one on the Arizona side of the Colorado River, and one on the Nevada side of the Colorado River
  • 17 generators – 9 on the Arizona powerhouse, 7 in the Nevada powerhouse
  • 4+ billion kilowatt hours produced each year
  • 10 acres of floor space
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Hoover Dam Powerhouses viewed from pedestrian walkway on the New Hoover Dam Bridge

Power from Hoover Dam is used by:

  • 56% California
  • 25% Nevada
  • 19% Arizona

Water from Lake Mead, controlled by Hoover Dam:

  • Serves 8 million people in Arizona, Nevada and California
  • Downstream releases of water from Lake Mead at Hoover Dam provide water for both municipal and irrigation uses.
  • Water released from the Hoover Dam eventually reaches the All-American Canal for the irrigation of over 1,000,000 acres of land in Southern Arizona, California, and Mexico.
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Lake Mead water Overflows Around Hoover Dam, as seen from Arizona Side. An Old Hoover Dam Postcard – circa 1983

Lake Mead

  • Required over 6 years to fill. This slow filling process was necessary to reduce the pressures on the dam and helped prevent small earthquakes from land settlement from the weight of the water.
  • 589 feet (181 meters) at the deepest point
  • 247 square miles
  • 110 miles (176 km) long
  • Named after Dr. Elwood Mead, Commissioner of the Bureau of Reclamation (1924 – 1936)
  • Largest man-made reservoir in the United States